[<< wiktionary] troll
== English ==


=== Pronunciation ===
(UK) IPA(key): /tɹɒl/, /tɹəʊl/
(US) IPA(key): /tɹoʊl/, /tɹɑl/

Rhymes: -əʊl, -ɒl


=== Etymology 1 ===
From Norwegian or Swedish troll or Danish trold, from Old Norse trǫll (“witch, mage, conjurer”) (compare Icelandic tröll), related to Middle High German trolle (“spook, wraith, monster, ogre”). From Proto-Germanic *truzlą (“a supernatural being; demon; fiend; giant; monster”). Norwegian fortrylle (“to bewitch”), Norwegian and Danish trylle (“to conjure”) and Swedish trolla (“to conjure”). Doublet of droll.


==== Noun ====
troll (plural trolls)

(fantasy) A supernatural being of varying size, now especially a grotesque humanoid creature living in caves or hills or under bridges. [from early 17th c.]

(slang) An ugly person of either sex, especially one seeking sexual experiences.

(astronomy, meteorology) Optical ejections from the top of the electrically active core regions of thunderstorms that are red in color that seem to occur after tendrils of vigorous sprites extend downward toward the cloud tops.


===== Derived terms =====
patent troll
trolless


===== Translations =====


=== Etymology 2 ===
From Middle English troll (“to go about, stroll, roll from side to side”), from Old French troller (“to quest, to wander”) (French trôler), of Germanic origin, ultimately from Proto-Germanic *truzlōną (“to lumber”), which is probably related to *trudaną (“to tread, step on”).
Related to Middle High German trollen (“to stroll”), Middle Low German drullen (“to stroll”); fishing sense possibly influenced by trawl and/or trail


==== Verb ====
troll (third-person singular simple present trolls, present participle trolling, simple past and past participle trolled)

(intransitive) To saunter. [from late 14th c.]
(intransitive) To trundle, to roll from side to side. [from early 15th c.]
(transitive, figuratively) To draw someone or something out, to entice, to lure as if with trailing bait. [from the 1500s]

(intransitive, fishing, by extension) To fish using a line and bait or lures trailed behind a boat similarly to trawling; to lure fish with bait. [from circa 1600]
1834-1874, George Bancroft, History of the United States, from the Discovery of the American Continent.
Their young men  […]  trolled along the brooks that abounded in fish.
(transitive) To angle for with a trolling line, or with a hook drawn along the surface of the water; hence, to allure.
(transitive) To fish in; to try to catch fish from.

With patient angle trolls the finny deep.
(slang, intransitive) To stroll about in order to find a sexual partner. [from 20th c.]
Synonym: cruise

(intransitive, Internet slang) (to post inflammatory material so as) to attempt to lure others into combative argument for purposes of personal entertainment and/or gratuitous disruption, especially in an online community or discussion [from late 20th c.]
1993 October 11, “danny burstein” (username), “I trolled, and no one bit!”, in alt.folklore.urban, Usenet
(transitive, originally Internet slang, by extension) To incite anger (including outside of an Internet context); to provoke, harass or annoy.
1994 March 8, “Robert Royar” (username), “OK, here's more on trolling”, in comp.edu.composition, Usenet:
trolling isn't aimed at newbies. It's aimed at self-important people


===== Translations =====


==== Noun ====
troll (plural trolls)

An instance of trolling, especially, in fishing, the trailing of a baited line. [from circa 1600]
 (Internet slang) A person who provokes others (chiefly on the Internet) for their own personal amusement or to cause disruption. [from late 20th c.]
Coordinate term: griefer


==== Translations ====


===== Derived terms =====


===== Translations =====


=== Etymology 3 ===
From Middle English trollen, trollin (“to walk, wander”). Cognate with Low German trullen (“to troll”).


==== Verb ====
troll (third-person singular simple present trolls, present participle trolling, simple past and past participle trolled)

(transitive, intransitive, obsolete) To move circularly; to roll; to turn. [from the 15th c.]

(transitive, obsolete) To send about; to circulate, as a vessel in drinking.
c. 1553, author unknown, Gammer Gurton's Needle
Then doth she troll to the bowl.

(transitive, intransitive, archaic) To sing the parts of in succession, as of a round, a catch, and the like; also, to sing loudly, freely or in a carefree way. [from the 16th c.]
c. 1610-11, William Shakespeare, The Tempest, Act III scene ii[4]:
 […] Will you troll the catch / You taught me but whilere?
1662, Samuel Butler, Hudibras
His sonnets charmed the attentive crowd, / By wide-mouthed mortal trolled aloud.

1883, Howard Pyle, The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood Chapter V
Next, he opened his stall and spread his meat upon the bench, then, taking his cleaver and steel and clattering them together, he trolled aloud in merry tones: […] 


==== Noun ====
troll (plural trolls)

The act of moving round; routine; repetition.
(Can we find and add a quotation of Burke to this entry?)
A song whose parts are sung in succession; a catch; a round.
1845, John Wilson, The genius and character of Burns
Thence the catch and troll, while "Laughter, holding both his sides," sheds tears to song and ballad pathetic on the woes of married life.
(obsolete) A trolley.


===== Derived terms =====
troll plate


=== References ===


== French ==


=== Pronunciation ===
IPA(key): /tʁɔl/


=== Etymology 1 ===
From Swedish troll, from Old Norse troll, from Proto-Germanic *truzlą, from Proto-Indo-European *derǝ-, *drā-.


==== Noun ====
troll m (plural trolls)

troll (mythical being)


=== Etymology 2 ===
Borrowed from English troll.


==== Noun ====
troll m (plural trolls)

troll (inflammatory poster on the Internet)
(by extension) The act of trolling.


=== Further reading ===
“troll” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).


== Italian ==


=== Noun ===
troll m (invariable)

troll (grotesque person, Internet troll)


==== Derived terms ====
trollare


== Norwegian Bokmål ==


=== Etymology ===
From Old Norse trǫll, from Proto-Germanic *truzlą, from Proto-Indo-European *derǝ-, *drā-.


=== Pronunciation ===
IPA(key): /trol/, [tɾɔl]
Rhymes: -ɔl


=== Noun ===
troll n (definite singular trollet, indefinite plural troll, definite plural trolla or trollene)

troll (supernatural being)


==== Derived terms ====


=== References ===
“troll” in The Bokmål Dictionary.


== Norwegian Nynorsk ==


=== Etymology ===
From Old Norse trǫll, from Proto-Germanic *truzlą, from Proto-Indo-European *derǝ-, *drā-.


=== Pronunciation ===
IPA(key): /trɔlː/


=== Noun ===
troll n (definite singular trollet, indefinite plural troll, definite plural trolla)

troll (supernatural being)
1856, Ivar Aasen, Norske Ordsprog:
Dat eine Trollet skræmer inkje dat andre.
The one troll does not scare the other.


==== Derived terms ====
trollbinde
trollkjerring


=== References ===
“troll” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.


== Polish ==


=== Etymology ===
From English troll, from Old Norse trǫll (“witch, mage, conjurer”).


=== Pronunciation ===
IPA(key): /trɔl/


=== Noun ===
troll m anim

troll (supernatural being)
(colloquial, Internet slang) troll


==== Declension ====


=== Further reading ===
troll in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
troll in Polish dictionaries at PWN


== Portuguese ==


=== Alternative forms ===
trol


=== Noun ===
troll m (plural trolls)

(fantasy, Norse mythology) troll (large, grotesque humanoid living in caves, hills or under bridges)
(Internet) troll (person who provokes others and causes disruption)


== Spanish ==


=== Noun ===
troll m (plural trolls)

Alternative spelling of trol


== Swedish ==


=== Etymology ===
From Old Norse trǫll, from Proto-Germanic *truzlą, from Proto-Indo-European *derǝ-, *drā-.


=== Pronunciation ===
IPA(key): /trɔlː/


=== Noun ===
troll n

troll (supernatural being)


==== Declension ====


==== See also ====
förtrolla
trolla
trolldom
trolldryck
trollkarl
trollkona
trollkongen (Dovregubben)
trollkonst
trollkonstnär
trollkärring
trollunge