[<< wikiquote] Martin Lomasney
Martin Lomasney (December 3, 1859 – August 12, 1933) was a Massachusetts politician. He served as state senator, state representative, and alderman, but is best known as the political boss of Boston's West End. Nicknamed "the Mahatma" for his ability to marshal support for his preferred candidates, Lomasney controlled Ward Eight (later Ward Five, then Ward Three, due to redistricting) and wielded considerable influence in city and state politics for over forty years.


== Quotes ==
Don't write when you can talk; don't talk when you can nod your head.
Van Nostrand, Albert D. (December 1948). "The Lomasney Legend". The New England Quarterly. 21 (4): 437. JSTOR 361565There's got to be in every ward somebody that any bloke can come to—no matter what he's done—and get help. Help, you understand; none of your law and your justice, but help.
Van Nostrand, Albert D. (December 1948). "The Lomasney Legend". The New England Quarterly. 21 (4): 457. JSTOR 361565We don't tell 'em how to vote—we simply suggest.
Van Nostrand, Albert D. (December 1948). "The Lomasney Legend". The New England Quarterly. 21 (4): 437. JSTOR 361565The great mass of people are interested in only three things—food, clothing, and shelter. A politician in a district like mine sees to it that his people get these things.
O'Connor, Thomas H. (1995). The Boston Irish: A Political History. Boston: Northeastern University Press. p. 122. ISBN 9781555532208. Never let anyone get anything on you.
Galvin, John T. (December 1990). "The Mahatma Called the Shots, and Everyone Knew It: Part 2". The West Ender 6 (5):  p. 9. 


== External links ==