[<< wikiquote] George Granville, 1st Baron Lansdowne
George Granville, 1st Baron Lansdowne (9 March 1666 – 29 January 1735) was an English poet, playwright, and politician who served as a Privy Counsellor from 1712.


== Quotes ==
Of all pains, the greatest painIs to love, and love in vain.
The British Enchanters (1705), Act III, scene iii.Thy thoughts to nobler meditations give,And study how to die, not how to live.
Meditations on Death, Stanza 1; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 504.'Tis impious pleasure to delight in harm. And beauty should be kind, as well as charm.
To Myra, line 21; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), "Beauty", p. 57-63.Since truth and constancy are vain,Since neither love, nor sense of pain,Nor force of reason, can persuade,Then let example be obey'd.
To Myra; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), "Example", p. 242-43.Mankind, from Adam, have been women's fools;Women, from Eve, have been the devil's tools:Heaven might have spar'd one torment when we fell;Not left us women, or not threatened hell.
She-Gallants; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), "Women", p. 886-97.Happy the man, of mortals happiest he,Whose quiet mind from vain desires is free;Whom neither hopes deceive, nor fears torment,But lives at peace, within himself content;In thought, or act, accountable to noneBut to himself, and to the gods alone.
Epistle to Mrs. Higgons (1690), line 79; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), "Contentment", p. 133-36.But, oh! what mighty magician can assuageA woman's envy?
Progress of Beauty; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), "Envy", p. 226-27.The kiss you take is paid by that you give:The joy is mutual, and I'm still in debt.
Heroic Love, Act V, scene 1; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), "Kissing", p. 416-19.Whoe'er thou art, thy Lord and master see,Thou wast my Slave, thou art, or thou shalt be.
Inscription for a Figure representing the God of Love. See Genuine Works. (1732) I. 129. Version of a Greek couplet from the Greek Anthology.


== External links ==