[<< wikiquote] Livonian proverbs
Livonian is a language spoken in the Baltics.


== I ==
Ī'dst kūorast si'zzol, tuoizost ulzo.
Translation: In at one ear and out at the other.
English equivalent: Advice most needed are the least heeded.
"People often claim to hunger for truth, but seldom like the taste when it's served up."
George R.R. Martin, A Clash of Kings (1998)
Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 179. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. Iks äb või kõ'd izānd pālkali.
Translation: Nobody can serve two masters.
English equivalent: Also, Nobody can serve two masters.
Meaning: One cannot serve two conflicting causes simultaneously. If this is attempted neither will be served properly.
Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 283. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. Jegā ikš eņtš voņ kaļāj.
Translation: Every man is the smith of his own fortune.
English equivalent: Also, Every man is the smith of his own fortune.
Meaning:  In shaping one's own fortune one should not rely on the help of others, as they are also concerned mainly about their own matters.
Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 388. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 


== K ==
Kis äb tō' ti'edō tīedō, se äb sō ka sīedõ.
Translation: He who does not want to work, that cannot eat either.
Idiomatic translation: He that will not work, shall not eat.
Meaning: Without due effort one is not entitled to the fruits of the work.
Source for proverb and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 256. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 


== L ==
Liegīz vie'd sizāl kivāmstiz.
Translation: It is good fishing in streamy water.
English equivalent: It is good fishing in troubled waters.
Meaning: In taking advantage of chaotic conditions one can easily serve one's own purposes.
Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 391. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 


== M ==
Mingi izā, seļļi pūoga.
Translation: Such father, such son.
English equivalent: Like father, like son.
Meaning: Sons may look and behave like their fathers. This is due to inheritance and the example observed closely and daily.
Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 170. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 


== O ==
Op koņtš, kalmõ lä'd.
Translation: Learn until the grave comes.
Idiomatic translation: We are to learn as long as we live.
Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 182. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 


== P ==
Pū äb sadā e'zmis napsɑks.
Idiomatic translation: Little strokes fell great oaks.
Meaning: A difficult task, e. g. removing a person/group from a strong position, or changing established ideas cannot be done quickly. It can be achieved gradually, by small steps, a little at a time.
Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 252. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 


== U ==
Umārz umārzpūst kōgaz äb dadā.
Idiomatic translation: The apple does not fall far from the tree.
Meaning: Children observe daily and — in their behaviour — often follow the example of their parents.
Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 259. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. Ūz lūdō pū'stōb ṗu'dōks pḭrand.
Translation: New brooms clean the floor. (Livonian)
English equivalent: A new broome sweepeth cleane.
Meaning: "We should never use an old tool when the extra labor in consequence costs more than a new one. Thousands wear out their lives and waste their time merely by the use of dull and unsuitable instruments."
Alternate meaning: "We often apply it to exchanges among servants, clerks, or any persons employed, whose service, at first, in any new place, is very good, both efficient and faithful; but very soon, when all the new circumstances have lost their novelty, and all their curiosity has ceased, they naturally fall into their former and habitual slackness."
Source for meaning: Porter, William Henry (1845). Proverbs: Arranged in Alphabetical Order .... Munroe and Company. p. 38. 
Paczolay, Gyula (1997). "12". European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. 92. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 


== See also ==
Latvian proverbs